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TMNT: Legends – Feedback (Cost)

The amazing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Legends, may be a highly addictive 3D turn-based RPG, but it’s also one (if not, THE) most expensive IAP games on iphone and Android. Commanding up to £64.99 for just one guaranteed character (that you’ll still have to level-up from scratch) is hard to grasp, but believe it or not…there are many gamers paying it! Level Caps in TMNT: Legends There are two types of players. 1) Hardcore RPG grinders (like myself) and 2) Casual gamers who hunt for cheat codes, from the get-go. The latter are those who are more likely to spend big bucks from the beginning. However, if you like to get the most out of such an RPG, but still wish to sensibly support the developers (see our guide), you’ll notice a huge brick wall that prevents you from progressing mid-game. Watch out for the mushroom men…they’ll cost you a fortune! Once you hit chapter 4, you’ll be introduced to the mushrooms. These cheating little buggers, look like jellyfish and will not only enjoy kicking your butt with dual attacks, but will boost their teams dodge and defence with every turn! Up to this point, you probably thought you had the game sussed, right? You put anything from £3-15 in to support the developers, you ground like a mother to get your team from two stars to three (level 25-35) but you’re still getting your ass kicked and you haven’t even grind-unlocked Donatello, yet! Now, it’s painfully obvious that Chapter 4 is the money-maker for Ludia. But if you’ve spent anywhere from £5-15 to help you get this far, is it right to STILL aggressively nudge the player to spend more money to progress? Especially, when character card packs are so overpriced for what you’ll actually receive? TMNT: Legends – Card Packs Don’t get us wrong, here. We love TMNT: Legends but...

TMNT Legends: What should you spend your money on?

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Legends may be a free game for mobile (and a great little RPG), but free-to-play means you’re going to be nudged to spend real-world cash at some point. While D4G always recommend spending some form of cash on the free-to-play games you love the most, you still have to make sure you’re supporting sensibly. As you may already know, TMNT:Legends has one of the most expensive IAP (In App Purchase) models to date. Progression depends on the growth and expansion of your characters, and doing this will require grinding for new character DNA cards or buying Card Packs. However, these packs currently cost anywhere between £8.99 and £44.99 and currently only guarantee one random character, simply making them far too much of a risk. So, what should you spend your money on, to both support the developer and progress sensibly through the game? Greenbacks and Warp Cards At first, our recommendation would’ve been a £1.79 purchase of warp cards (x50) or Greenbacks ($200). Warp cards allow you to quickly farm materials, pizza, mutagen and even Character DNA cards, without needing to fight through that stage (providing you were awarded 3 stars for it). Greenbacks allow you to buy the precious pizza you’ll need to fight or grind. However, remember that both of these are dropped from battles and/or daily rewards…so don’t go mad. Antonios Pizza Card Pack The second (and currently our most recommended pick) is the Antonio’s Card Pack. You’ll find this by touching the pizza counter on the top of your screen. At first, we thought you’d only bag up to 1000 pizza slices, but on opening, we’ve also received up to 950 mutagen, 25 greenbacks and some useful materials. This makes the Antonio’s Card Pack a must, not only for the developer-supporting gamer, but for some much-needed help if you’re struggling to progress through...

TMNT: Legends Tips – Pizza Energy

Ninja Turtles: Legends is the first 3D turn-based TMNT RPG. Due to this fact, many loyal Turtles fans (us included) will flock to install this great little game. However, just like many free-to-play mobile games, it can get costly if you don’t know what you’re doing. The first of D4G’s TMNT: Legends tips, will advise you on how to manage your pizza energy. Every battle will require around 6-12 pizza slices (this may increase with higher levels or special levels). You’ll only accumulate 1-2 slices every 6 mins. This may sound like a lot, but it’s really not if you need to grind (and trust us…you will). To level up more efficiently, understand that the only thing restricting you is pizza. You can grind regardless of how many warp cards, cash, materials or characters that you have. When to use pizza energy Once you’re at a point where you’re getting your ass kicked, and can’t progress to the next level, head back to the easiest ‘Hard Mode’ level. These are unlocked for every chapter, once all regular stages have been completed. You don’t get much XP or mutagen for regular stages, so only play them when your leveled-up enough to continue the story. Until then, focus on a hard stage that’s the quickest to complete. That way, you’ll gain more XP, mutagen, materials and most important of all…DNA card drops! Patience produces pizza Like all good pizzas…they’ll take time. Try not to grind when your pizza isn’t really stacked that high, as this will increase the temptation to buy card packs. Instead, time roughly how long it takes to accumulate a full stack of pizza. Once you’re fully loaded, it’s time to hit the streets! ——————————————————————— Related Articles – TMNT: Legends – Pricing Feedback – TMNT: Legends Tips – What to spend your money on – TMNT: Legends mobile game...

Ninja Turtles: Legends

Whether you’re a ‘Hero’ or ‘Ninja’ Turtles fan (even though I’m a retro 80’s fan, I still prefer Ninja), a TMNT RPG game should always turn heads. Enter Ludia, a mobile developer who have not only fully licensed the game, but have added something else that will have younger fans and older retro fans, reaching to touch ‘Install’. I’ll admit, tun-based RPG screenshots and shots of the retail-like ‘Card Shop’, got me hook, line and sinker! Flashbacks of collecting TMNT cards and stickers (and don’t forget that stick of bubblegum), came flooding back to me! Ludia, have worked hard to capture a true retro feel in terms of classic term-based combat, playground collecting and just about everything you ever loved about the Turtles universe! Is Ninja Turtles: Legends a 3D RPG or an RPG card game? We know it’s hard to believe, but TMNT: Legends is a 3D turn-based RPG (at last!), that makes very clever use of retail-styled cards. First, you’ll start the game with Leonardo and you’ll be introduced to a basic turn-based system, with just one attack button (don’t’ worry, you’ll unlock more as the game progresses). Your first enemies will actually look like something from the recent XCOM games and once defeated, you’ll receive your first cards. All those Turtles games and not one 3D turn-based RPG…until now (the first 2D RPG was TMNT – The Ninja Tribunal in 2009). After defeating all enemy waves in a mission, you may receive the following post-battle rewards: Character DNA Card – These will unlock new characters for turn-based battles XP: Unlocks new levels for your characters Mutagen Card – Used to level-up your characters and gain new abilities (if you have the materials) Material Card – From rope to training bags, you’ll need materials to help your characters learn new abilities Pizza Card – Used to energize your team for the next...

Should Game Embargoes Be Banned?

Many of us may still be enjoying DOOM (personally, I really love what Bethesda have done with the single player aspect), but like many gamers, I was forced to pre-order blind, due to no early reviews of the game. This was due to the dreaded ‘game embargo’. What is a game embargo? This is a restriction placed upon critics, to prevent them from publishing a games review, before its official launch. This restriction was first put in place to protect the hype and let the marketing machine shift pre-orders. Look at it this way – If the hype is there (usually created from a remake or long-awaited sequel), the only thing an early review can do…is damage that hype. Of course, that’s what the publishers think. But today, gamers aren’t stupid and know that a game embargo usually means that something is wrong and not quite finished with the product. This could be anything from bugs to weak single or multiplayer elements. Should the game embargo be banned? Publishers are now arguing that the game embargo will allow for online multiplayer to be tweaked before the games release. They’ll also say that online games and servers will be hard to truly test before release day. But is that really true? For the game Embargo – Benefits those who do not wish to read any reviews before playing – Will allow critics to play multiplayer games with full servers Against Embargo – Will force developers to release clean, bug-free games – Developers will strive harder to create games they’ll be truly proud of, generating earned pre-orders – Will give gamers peace of mind when laying down their cash for pre-orders – If a game does have single player and multiplayer elements, this may convince publishers to allow critics to review the single player portion, before release. The publisher can then allow critics to...

Are SP+MP Games Being Reviewed Fairly?

Bethesda’s DOOM is now on our HD’s and with the first batch of reviews being uploaded from major critics, comes D4G’s next burning question – Are critics reviewing games with single player and multiplayer elements, fairly? Why do we ask this? Well, let’s take a look at the following examples of popular FPS games: Metro Last Light: Has no MP but offers a strong and well-sized campaign. Avg score: 8.2/10 Titanfall: Has no single player and is pure online-only. Avg score: 8.6/10 COD Modern Warfare: Had strong (but very short) SP but strong MP. Avg 9/10 Doom: Had strong and well-sized SP but had flawed MP at launch. Avg 7.6 After looking at recent releases and their critic/community feedback, it doesn’t take a rocket science to work out that multiplayer FPS games sell. However, what isn’t starting to make sense is the way in which SP+MP releases are being critiqued. After looking at COD releases and the latest DOOM, a frightening pattern begins to emerge. Are critiques right to allow the MP portion of the game to heavily influence a games overall score? Are we starting to hear the following, a little too much: “Has strong single player experience but is let down by weak MP”. So, basically…if the dev had scrapped the MP and released just the single player campaign, they would’ve bagged themselves a higher score??? A very simple method that could resolve this, would be to score both elements separately. A critic would give two scores for such a SP+MP game. One for its campaign and one for its multiplayer. What do you think? Let us know by the comments below....

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