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TMNT: Legends – Feedback (Cost)

The amazing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Legends, may be a highly addictive 3D turn-based RPG, but it’s also one (if not, THE) most expensive IAP games on iphone and Android. Commanding up to £64.99 for just one guaranteed character (that you’ll still have to level-up from scratch) is hard to grasp, but believe it or not…there are many gamers paying it! Level Caps in TMNT: Legends There are two types of players. 1) Hardcore RPG grinders (like myself) and 2) Casual gamers who hunt for cheat codes, from the get-go. The latter are those who are more likely to spend big bucks from the beginning. However, if you like to get the most out of such an RPG, but still wish to sensibly support the developers (see our guide), you’ll notice a huge brick wall that prevents you from progressing mid-game. Watch out for the mushroom men…they’ll cost you a fortune! Once you hit chapter 4, you’ll be introduced to the mushrooms. These cheating little buggers, look like jellyfish and will not only enjoy kicking your butt with dual attacks, but will boost their teams dodge and defence with every turn! Up to this point, you probably thought you had the game sussed, right? You put anything from £3-15 in to support the developers, you ground like a mother to get your team from two stars to three (level 25-35) but you’re still getting your ass kicked and you haven’t even grind-unlocked Donatello, yet! Now, it’s painfully obvious that Chapter 4 is the money-maker for Ludia. But if you’ve spent anywhere from £5-15 to help you get this far, is it right to STILL aggressively nudge the player to spend more money to progress? Especially, when character card packs are so overpriced for what you’ll actually receive? TMNT: Legends – Card Packs Don’t get us wrong, here. We love TMNT: Legends but...

Ninja Turtles: Legends

Whether you’re a ‘Hero’ or ‘Ninja’ Turtles fan (even though I’m a retro 80’s fan, I still prefer Ninja), a TMNT RPG game should always turn heads. Enter Ludia, a mobile developer who have not only fully licensed the game, but have added something else that will have younger fans and older retro fans, reaching to touch ‘Install’. I’ll admit, tun-based RPG screenshots and shots of the retail-like ‘Card Shop’, got me hook, line and sinker! Flashbacks of collecting TMNT cards and stickers (and don’t forget that stick of bubblegum), came flooding back to me! Ludia, have worked hard to capture a true retro feel in terms of classic term-based combat, playground collecting and just about everything you ever loved about the Turtles universe! Is Ninja Turtles: Legends a 3D RPG or an RPG card game? We know it’s hard to believe, but TMNT: Legends is a 3D turn-based RPG (at last!), that makes very clever use of retail-styled cards. First, you’ll start the game with Leonardo and you’ll be introduced to a basic turn-based system, with just one attack button (don’t’ worry, you’ll unlock more as the game progresses). Your first enemies will actually look like something from the recent XCOM games and once defeated, you’ll receive your first cards. All those Turtles games and not one 3D turn-based RPG…until now (the first 2D RPG was TMNT – The Ninja Tribunal in 2009). After defeating all enemy waves in a mission, you may receive the following post-battle rewards: Character DNA Card – These will unlock new characters for turn-based battles XP: Unlocks new levels for your characters Mutagen Card – Used to level-up your characters and gain new abilities (if you have the materials) Material Card – From rope to training bags, you’ll need materials to help your characters learn new abilities Pizza Card – Used to energize your team for the next...

Should Game Embargoes Be Banned?

Many of us may still be enjoying DOOM (personally, I really love what Bethesda have done with the single player aspect), but like many gamers, I was forced to pre-order blind, due to no early reviews of the game. This was due to the dreaded ‘game embargo’. What is a game embargo? This is a restriction placed upon critics, to prevent them from publishing a games review, before its official launch. This restriction was first put in place to protect the hype and let the marketing machine shift pre-orders. Look at it this way – If the hype is there (usually created from a remake or long-awaited sequel), the only thing an early review can do…is damage that hype. Of course, that’s what the publishers think. But today, gamers aren’t stupid and know that a game embargo usually means that something is wrong and not quite finished with the product. This could be anything from bugs to weak single or multiplayer elements. Should the game embargo be banned? Publishers are now arguing that the game embargo will allow for online multiplayer to be tweaked before the games release. They’ll also say that online games and servers will be hard to truly test before release day. But is that really true? For the game Embargo – Benefits those who do not wish to read any reviews before playing – Will allow critics to play multiplayer games with full servers Against Embargo – Will force developers to release clean, bug-free games – Developers will strive harder to create games they’ll be truly proud of, generating earned pre-orders – Will give gamers peace of mind when laying down their cash for pre-orders – If a game does have single player and multiplayer elements, this may convince publishers to allow critics to review the single player portion, before release. The publisher can then allow critics to...

Are SP+MP Games Being Reviewed Fairly?

Bethesda’s DOOM is now on our HD’s and with the first batch of reviews being uploaded from major critics, comes D4G’s next burning question – Are critics reviewing games with single player and multiplayer elements, fairly? Why do we ask this? Well, let’s take a look at the following examples of popular FPS games: Metro Last Light: Has no MP but offers a strong and well-sized campaign. Avg score: 8.2/10 Titanfall: Has no single player and is pure online-only. Avg score: 8.6/10 COD Modern Warfare: Had strong (but very short) SP but strong MP. Avg 9/10 Doom: Had strong and well-sized SP but had flawed MP at launch. Avg 7.6 After looking at recent releases and their critic/community feedback, it doesn’t take a rocket science to work out that multiplayer FPS games sell. However, what isn’t starting to make sense is the way in which SP+MP releases are being critiqued. After looking at COD releases and the latest DOOM, a frightening pattern begins to emerge. Are critiques right to allow the MP portion of the game to heavily influence a games overall score? Are we starting to hear the following, a little too much: “Has strong single player experience but is let down by weak MP”. So, basically…if the dev had scrapped the MP and released just the single player campaign, they would’ve bagged themselves a higher score??? A very simple method that could resolve this, would be to score both elements separately. A critic would give two scores for such a SP+MP game. One for its campaign and one for its multiplayer. What do you think? Let us know by the comments below....

Street Fighter V’s Engine – What do you think?

What were your thoughts on seeing Street Fighter V for the first time? Did you expect Capcom to keep the same SFIV style, or did you have your money on a more realistic-looking engine? Screenshots have been released from Street Fighter V’s early development stages, telling us that Capcom originally felt the need to pull away from SFIV’s art brush-like style: Another look at a more realistic Ryu: At first glance, you’d be forgiven for thinking you were looking at a latest Tekken release. Maybe this was the very reason Capcom scrapped the idea? But was the decision to stick close to SFIV’s art style, the right one? Could Capcom be toying with a realistic look for SF6? More importantly…do you think Capcom made the right decision on staying with the same engine style? Let us know in the comments section....

Will Nintendo NX Play WiiU Games?

Nintendo are currently dealing with one major question- When will the Nintendo NX be released (we get that feeling WWE were lucky to get to ‘NXT’, first). However, this actually begs a second question – What will happen to the Wii U? This question is possibly the most important one Nintendo will answer. Why? Well, because the question isn’t just asking about Nintendo’s future in hardware support…it’s asking about their future support to loyal customers. The way we see it, Ninty have two options, here: 1) Once Nintendo NX launches, continue support and development of Wii U games for at least 2 more years. 2) Develop the Nintendo NX so it’s fully backwards compatible with Wii U games. This could also setup some kind of WiiU trade-in campaign (or at least offer NX discounts if you submit your new WiiU console serial). We really hope Nintendo goes for the latter. The first options would simply spread Nintendo’s development rather thin. Let’s be honest, large games libraries have never really been Nintendo’s strongest quality, so having to develop 3DS and WiiU games, would mean launching the new NX hardware with less than half the company behind it. With DeNA helping Nintendo to bring some its most beloved games to mobile devices, we’re still pretty confident the NX could well double as a living room docking station console and a mobile/handheld. Have you had a WiiU since launch or are you contemplating buying one soon? Either way, let us know what one of the above options you’d profer to see, once the NX has been launched?...

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