Pre E3 2010 – Move or Natal?

E3 2010 is almost upon us and although we’ve heard that no other next gen consoles are to be released, there are still many official announcements, to get pumped about. As you may already know, the reason for lack of new games system technology, is because Sony and Microsoft are pretty ticked off with the amount of hardware, Nintendo have shifted. So…as any competitor will do, they’re all jumping on the band wagon and wanting those party-mad families, to jump around in front of their systems, instead (we hope for the industries sake, it’s not just for more “party games”). The PS3 Move Sony’s ‘Move’ looks to offer incredible similarities, to the Nintendo Wii’s Wiimote. Instead of taking a basic TV remote design (like Ninty), Sony have opted for a more modern take, and have crafted a more slicker, rounder design. Take your new-age DVD remote, add an over-sized ping pong ball on the top and you pretty much have the PS3 Move controller. BUT…after all…it’s not about how your hardware looks (as Nintendo have already proved) it’s how your games play. Sony’s Move not only borrows from the Wii’s design, but it also functions the same. Movements made by the player with the Move remote, are mimicked on screen, either by character or interactive objects. The most welcomed aspect however, is the ease of use and prompt response. Existing eye games can now be re-released (or updated) to become compatible with the PS3 Move, offering more enjoyable gaming. Two downsides to the PS3 eye, was the amount of space a player needed, as well as the perfect amount of light required, while playing. The 360 Natal Microsoft’s ‘Natal’ looks very advanced…possibly promising slightly too much, for it’s own good. Total voice recognition and multiple player mapping? (being able to differentiate one person/player, overlapping another). I’m afraid we’ll believe...

PlayStation 2 Games on PSN

When you first unwrapped you PlayStation 3 the last thing you thought about was the consoles online network. You were too busy drooling over the trailer of Killzone 2, wishing Konami would release more on Metal Gear Solid 4 and saving your next months wages for one Blu-Ray movie. Now however, PlayStaion 3’s online support has started to gain momentum. Every Tuesday, you can now expect to see more game ad-ons, PSP games and demos (well…sometimes), PS3 demos and more importantly (well, to us anyway) PSone classics. PlayStation Network (or PSN as it’s now known) is starting to become a major selling point for the Blu-Ray equipped console. 50GB capacity discs, super high quality DVD’s, PSone Classics, Metal Gear, Killzone…it’s starting to look a lot better for Sony, that’s for sure. Sony’s Selective Backwards Compatibility We all remember that great E3 when the 360, PS3 and Wii (or ‘Revolution’ as it was referred to then), were first announced (possibly our greatest E3 ever). One of Sony’s body shots was PS3’s ability to plays existing PS2 games. This was exciting news as not only could you quickly trade in your PS2 for some tasty PS3 credit, but you could also keep those classics such as Metal Gear Solid 3, Devil May Cry 3, Okami and many more. BUT…after the consoles launch, it was suddenly announced that PS3’s compatibility would only be fully supported in Japan. Only launch (60GB) PS3 consoles would be the only BC PS3’s in the UK and US. Put all of this together and you start to understand what Sony are getting at. However, it is kinda funny that it took them a while to get there, though (originally releasing PS3’s with PS2 Backwards compatibility). Sony now have a superb opportunity to make money on existing PS2 games…but are we ticked off? Well, yes and no. We...

Mirror’s Edge – You Gotta Have Faith

Lets all be honest…how many original FPS games do you have on your “To Buy” List? By original, we don’t mean a sequel of a successful IP with the added ability of wall mounting. We mean totally original games that had the developers, producers and marketing teams, sweating over the first day of release… A New Breed of FPS Mirror’s Edge was released in November 2008. The games developer (Dice) had shown some very welcomed trailers showing FPS gameplay with a unique twist. In Mirror’s Edge, your first instinct wouldn’t be to grab the nearest gun or to shoot the nearest barrel. The gameplay was fast, fluid, but yet graceful in its delivery. Instead of hunting down enemies, your missions were to stealthily infiltrate and/or escape…as fast as possible. But it would take some serious game mechanics and level design, to keep the player hooked throughout. The first thing that jumped-out to gamers were bright, clean and distinctive looks. The engine was sharp, cities looked believable and yet the engine still offered a futuristic anime-style. This jaw-dropping and unique FPS had you playing as the super athlete, Faith. In the unique and futuristic world of Mirror’s edge, Faith is a “Runner” who possesses incredible and fast initiative, acrobatic techniques and a “no fear” attitude to what you or I would class as suicide. When Mirror’s edge was first previewed, it was clear this FPS would take the genre in a new direction, using Faith’s abilities to maneuver around enemies, rather than gun through them. Gameplay That Dared to be Different Run, jump…and then run some more. Doesn’t really sound like much, does it? Surly an FPS needs more to retain the attention of the player? This is where Mirror’s Edge had stolen the spotlight at many gaming events. The way DICE had designed levels and enabled the player to...